Who Had Better Trenches In Ww1?

Is 1917 a true story?

A story shared by director Sam Mendes’ grandfather, a veteran of the Western Front, inspired the new World War I film.

The new World War I drama from director Sam Mendes, 1917, unfolds in real-time, tracking a pair of British soldiers as they cross the Western Front on a desperate rescue mission..

How did they build trenches in ww1?

The WWI trenches were built as a system, in a zigzag pattern with many different levels along the lines. They had paths dug so that soldiers could move between the levels. Trenches typically had an embankment at the top and a barbed wire fence. … The trenches were dug by soldiers and there were three ways to dig them.

How long did it take to dig the trenches in ww1?

approximately 6 hoursBritish guidelines for trench construction inform us that it took 450 men approximately 6 hours to dig 275 yards of a front-line trench (approx. 7 feet deep, 6 feet wide) a night. The other option was sapping, where a trench was extended by digging at the end face.

What did the trenches smell like?

They could smell cordite, the lingering odour of poison gas, rotting sandbags, stagnant mud, cigarette smoke, and cooking food. Although overwhelmed at first, new arrivals soon got used to it and eventually became part of the smell with their own body odour.

How did soldiers sleep in ww1?

Getting to sleep When able to rest, soldiers in front line trenches would try and shelter from the elements in dugouts. These varied from deep underground shelters to small hollows in the side of trenches – as shown here.

What was good about trench warfare?

The terrible casualties sustained in open warfare meant that trench warfare was introduced very quickly. Trenches provided a very efficient way for soldiers to protect themselves against heavy firepower and within four months, soldiers on all fronts had begun digging trenches.

What were conditions like for soldiers in ww1?

Trenches were long, narrow ditches dug into the ground where soldiers lived. They were very muddy, uncomfortable and the toilets overflowed. These conditions caused some soldiers to develop medical problems such as trench foot.

Who has the best trenches in ww1?

Simple answer: Germany, by far. Why? Because Germany recognized, at the beginning of stalemate in late ’14, that frontal assault was suicide, and that defensive warfare was far more economical and efficient, unlike the allies who kept trying for the “great breakthrough”.

What countries had trenches in ww1?

Trenches were common throughout the Western Front. Trench warfare in World War I was employed primarily on the Western Front, an area of northern France and Belgium that saw combat between German troops and Allied forces from France, Great Britain and, later, the United States.

Why was WWI so deadly?

The loss of life was greater than in any previous war in history, in part because militaries were using new technologies, including tanks, airplanes, submarines, machine guns, modern artillery, flamethrowers, and poison gas. … These trenches came to symbolize a new kind of warfare.

Why did they use trenches in ww1?

Trench warfare is resorted to when the superior firepower of the defense compels the opposing forces to “dig in” so extensively as to sacrifice their mobility in order to gain protection. did you know? During WWI, trenches were used to try to protect soldiers from poison gas, giving them more time to put on gas masks.

What killed most soldiers in ww1?

The casualties suffered by the participants in World War I dwarfed those of previous wars: some 8,500,000 soldiers died as a result of wounds and/or disease. The greatest number of casualties and wounds were inflicted by artillery, followed by small arms, and then by poison gas.

How was life in the trenches boring?

Due to the attrition tactics of both armies during World War I, life in the trenches was usually a boring but dangerous existence punctuated by small attacks and only the occasional full scale battle. What was a typical day like in the trenches on the Western Front?

Who had the advantage in trench warfare?

The defenders had the advantage because they could plan what they could do to kill the enemy while they were still approaching and specifically because of the trenches they had made, which helped the defenders drastically.

What happened to the dead soldiers in ww1?

The dead was usually buried right where they fell, and as soon as possible. Burying them was more important than the war itself because piles of rotting bodies would’ve caused plagues and decimated both sides. For this reason the opponents sometimes declared a ceasefire only to bury the dead.

Was ww1 or ww2 more brutal?

In total deaths, WW2 was bloodier by a long margin – 60+ million deaths in WW2 vs 17 million in WW1. However, to some extent WW1 was a lot more brutal for the soldiers while WW2 was a lot more bloodier for the civilians. … Thus, the density of military deaths in some of the most pitched battles was a lot more in WW1.

What was the land between two enemy trenches called?

no man’s landThe terms used most frequently at the start of the war to describe the area between the trench lines included ‘between the trenches’ or ‘between the lines’. The term ‘no man’s land’ was first used in a military context by soldier and historian Ernest Swinton in his short story “The Point of View”.

What happened to trenches after ww1?

Years ago, when workers were digging to expand an industrial park, they dug up trenches that were will filled with bodies. After removing the bodies and committing them to graves, they cleared out the trenches and reinforced them with concrete (made to look like sandbags) so it could become a memorial park.

Do any ww1 trenches still exist?

A few of these places are private or public sites with original or reconstructed trenches preserved as a museum or memorial. Nevertheless, there are still remains of trenches to be found in remote parts of the battlefields such as the woods of the Argonne, Verdun and the mountains of the Vosges.

What was the most common disease in the trenches?

Among the diseases and viruses that were most prevalent were influenza, typhoid, trench foot and trench fever.

Why were the trenches built zigzag and not in straight lines?

Trenches were dug in a zigzag pattern so that if an enemy entered the trench, he could not fire straight down the line. … Some trenches contained dugouts below the level of the trench floor, often as deep as 20 or 30 feet.